Interview

Carlo Tosin
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INTERVIEW with the Artists CARLO TOSIN

by Barbara Tampieri for Awards -Golden
Art site

bullet Just to start introducing you to our public, who is Carlo Tosin?
I would say I am an eclectic researcher in creativity. Creativity can be worked out in many fields, what is important is that you always put your own identity, your unique mark in everything you do.
bullet How did you start being involved with art, did you look for it or was it art to find you actually?
I believe in fate. I was probably destined to art.
bullet What was your training process, did you attend art schools and did you have teachers whom you consider your mentors?
School gave me some general information and training, then by studying art in the following years I could deepen my knowledge about themes and situations I loved. The starting point was my interest in all the artistic movements of the Sixites which influenced my art in the beginnning: spacialism, minimal art and "arte povera".
bullet Are there photographers and other artists inspiring you?
I am an abstractist with a constructivist character. Starting from an initial project I am seeking for always new combinations of materials and colors to combine on the space I am using.
bullet Some say mastering drawing is the most important part of the painting technique. What is your opinion about?
The mastering of drawing is very important because it teaches you how to deal with simmetry and proportions.
Nowadays we see that international avant-garde movements appreciate a kind of art which I call a very conceptual way to take many images from our society whose meaning are then completely changed in a provocative way. I like that approach but my style is something different, I want to make works that cannot be fixed into a specific movement.
bullet When was the first time you were really satisfied with the result of your work? I mean, is there any of your paintings you consider the best you ever made?
In 1993 I made a painting - now belonging to a private collection, that really was a change in my research. Its new approach introduced some bas-relief elements on canvas and was the first example of the "Totem" series.
bullet Is there a subject or technique you would like to try in the future, as a personal challenge?
I would like to work on much larger spaces, and create gallery or outdoor installations.
bullet Do you have a favorite subject (humans, nature, abstract)?
In my case the subject is not important since I don't use figurative codes.
bullet Please tell us about the significance of your "Totem" series.
Totems are a timeless image with a strong mystical and magical significance. The magic consists in its capability to capture the observer and let him enter its world where everything is possible.
bullet You work for leading companies as interiors and industrial designer. How do this job and your painting career match?
Design is different from art because it depends on functionality and ergonomy. Chairs are made for sitting, beds for sleeping and so on...
Art is totally free and I would say it needs drama to be born because it starts from a deeper necessity to find out our most intimate values. I believe design can express existential and behavioral meanings when it contributes to create the identity of the spaces we live in. It is often the objects that mark the invironment with the designer's special character.
bullet Your approach to design is very minimal and elegant, with a special sensitivity for shape. How do you think you can preserve beauty and functionality at the same time?
The fundamental contribution to design in terms of modernity in the last century was that of the Bauhaus Dessau school. Nowadays we just want to move further from what was already done there via the experimentation of new technologies and solutions.
bullet What made you change from traditional bidimensional painting to your last multi-dimensional dinamic works?
I wanted to give more fisicity to the painting, using various layers to express the vitality of matter where borders between painting and sculpture would be removed. I truly believe you cannot create theory in art without manuality.
bullet What are your future projects?
I will continue in my research by experimenting new materials and techniques.
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Which is the prize or recognition you consider the most important you received in your career?
Two of the most important recognitions were to be selected for the Sharja Museum in the Arab Emirates and my exhibition in Dusseldorf for the Stuttgard University.

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What do you want to communicate with your works?
I think art, like music, poetry, literature, science and culture in general is a discipline that has much to do with society and its amelioration and progress. I don't agree with those who say art is dead, I am against this kind of nihilism, because art will never day as long as it is a means to read social history.

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Do you believe artists when they say "they didn't necessarily put any hidden message into their works"?
I believe we artists always manage to irradiate some energy through our works which creates a magic bond between the object and the observer.

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To live just on his work is never easy for an artist, you have to deal with the most trivial sides of business and sometimes an artist feels he needs to sell his soul to success. How did you manage to remain pure in the art business world?
You have to deal with the business side of art because we live in business times. Art claims a lot of resources, either human and financial, time, moving and use of expensive materials. For all that you need money like in any other professional activity.

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How do you see the future in art? Will there be new movements, new means of exchanging experience among artists or the general materialism has already affected the art world?
In the past decades artistic groups were peculiar of avant-garde movements. Now that many ideologies have fallen art and artists do tend to operate as individuals more than groups.

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What is your biggest fear these days? And what makes you happy anyway?
My worst fear is this kind of cinism we find everywhere. We seem to be able to communicate only if we turn down our cultural level... Our society puts the economic value on top and human integrity and respect seem to be less important.

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If you were not an artist, who would you like to be?
To be an artist has to do with fate and predisposition. I am just someone who works eclectically inside the creative universe of our times' images.


Grazie infinite Carlo, per la tua disponibilitÓ.
Barbara